Menu
Whistler only for Germany without copy protection?

Whistler only for Germany without copy protection?

In the latest operating system from Microsoft Windows.net (working name Whistler) a new type of copy protection is implemented, which is supposed to prevent the program from being installed on multiple computers. In order to realize this, however, a complex procedure on the part of the customer is necessary.

A product key supplied with the operating system must be sent to To Microsoft. Furthermore, the serial numbers of the hardware parts of the user are required. From this, Microsoft generates an activation key to activate the Windows version. This mechanism should already be built into the beta version and will most likely also be integrated into the final. The reason for this rather complex procedure is found in the many pirated copies of existing Windows versions in circulation. In Greece the rate of illegally used copies is around 90%, in Germany it is still 27%. Microsoft now wants to finally put a stop to this. Only the German users still give the men around Bill Gates a headache. While the new copy protection has been very well received in the United States, users in this country are seen as particularly critical and open to other systems. This is also supported by the fact that in 1994 IBM was able to sell its OS/2 Warp operating system mainly in Germany. Germany is also one of the most active markets for Linux. Microsoft also fears that customers would prefer to stay with Windows 9x if the entry were made too difficult, because even if a new graphics card were installed, a new activation key would be required before Windows quit service after 50 days. Therefore, Germany may be spared the new copy protection.

Comments