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VIA KT400 - Resignation instead of innovation?

VIA KT400 - Resignation instead of innovation?

Rumors should not be overestimated, but what you could read on x-bit labs today may have opened the mouth wide for one or the other reader. According to a current roadmap from the chipset manufacturer, the KT400 will at least officially not support DDR400.

Was allowed to nVidia some time ago happy to have been first at least when the first DDR400 chipset was presented, VIA's setback could now help the newcomer to unexpected fame. Certainly, after even DDR333 hardly brought any speed advantage due to the asynchronous architecture of the Athlon platform, the usefulness of the also asynchronous DDR400 can be doubted - but it is a prestige duel in any case. But what might have motivated VIA to make this decision, after all, months ago they were the first manufacturer to wholeheartedly announced a corresponding chip? Certainly not to be ruled out the possibility that the implementation of the memory was not implemented out of common sense. The RAM has not yet been specified by JEDEC, nor has the current VIA P4 board with P4X400 and currently still slowly timed DDR400 assert itself against the competition with a relatively mature DDR333. Against this thesis, however, speaks the market behavior of most large corporations, whose strategies are less about meaning than about keywords and bare sales figures. Even loveless support of DDR400 would therefore make more sense than renouncing 'fame and honor'. Without this innovation, the KT400 should not only be doomed to failure in terms of its name. Integrated USB 2.0 is already offered by the newly offered combination of Northbridge VT8367 (KT333) and Southbridge VT8235, AGP 8x will only be of use in months (if at all) and the V-Link is also sufficiently high at 533MB/s. Should itAre there any difficulties in chip design after all? But why does nVidia and, according to its own statements, also SiS succeed in this step? Even if the final answer to these questions does not appear to be possible, apart from the outcome of the KT400, a number of manufacturers should generally think again about their market strategy. It is not quantity but quality that pays off. And last but not least, it has been said for generations: Arrogance comes before the fall.

VIA Roadmap