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Private copy or pirated copy?

Private copy or pirated copy?

The Copyright Act of 1965 gives everyone the right to make a private copy of radio broadcasts. Even the technical progress in the form of cassette recorders, video recorders or CD burners have not damaged the reputation of private copying.

With the boom of the Internet and the establishment of file sharing platforms such as Napster and Co., private copying suddenly came about in the disrepute of piracy. Now this possibility is to be restricted. A legal basis for this is to be implemented by the end of 2002 through an EU directive on digital copyright. The current draft law allows providers of digital content to provide their products with copy protection, but at the same time prohibits users from circumventing copy protection. However, the Ministry of Justice is no longer entirely sure of its cause, because anyone who overrides the protection for private use should not be liable to prosecution.

However, the industry already has a solution for this conflict. The industry has in mind that the user no longer buys the medium himself, but rather the right to use it. This concept goes by the name of 'DRM' - 'Digital Rights Management'. The personal usage rights are then managed via a digital safe. Anyone who has acquired the appropriate license can then listen to song X as often as they want, download it from the Internet or transfer it to other media. This can also be transferred to other media such as books, films and games. The possibility of selling music tracks individually would be advantageous for customers and manufacturers. You would no longer be forced to buy music in cardboard boxes. Another advantage would be that the manufacturers of recorders, PCs and printers would no longer have to pay any GEMA royalties, since fees for a copy would be included in the license costs. To what extent this conceptThe decision will be made with the publication of the EU directive on digital copyright. What is certain, however, is that the industry will not be satisfied with the current state of free copying and uncontrolled distribution of copyrighted material.