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PowerQuest Lost & Found in the test: data recovery for HDDs that are still rotating

PowerQuest Lost & Found in the test: data recovery for HDDs that are still rotating

Preface

For the average computer user, there is usually nothing worse than a total crash. The causes of such data loss can be very different. For example, a software or operating error can very quickly cause the boot sector with all partition data to be lost. And a hardware failure as a cause of data loss is not as rare as you might think. Even if you feel safe with your branded hard drive and therefore do without any data backups, the screaming is great if all of a sudden, perhaps through a gimmick of the user himself, all data is lost the next time the system boots. Since a professional data rescue in special companies quickly reaches into the three-digit and four-digit DM range, such a solution is not profitable for private users who may only want to save a few important documents. The company PowerQuest has a program on offer for exactly this case, which can save data as long as the hard disk is still 'rotating'.

Scope of delivery

For a price of 69.95 US dollars, in addition to the large packaging, you get no more than two floppy disks, a user manual and an outdated advertising brochure in which Drive Image 2 (currently the current version 4) touted as the best in the world. The Lost & Found version on the floppy disks is 1.02, with an update to 1.06 already available on the Internet and laterwill still be of importance. Since the manual was obviously written for version 1.00, you shouldn't attach too much importance to the graphics, as they sometimes no longer exist in this form. Another downer is that both the software and the complete manual are only available in English. But when it comes to restoring your own data, you also like to fight your way through an English user guide, don't you?

PowerQuest Lost & Found
PowerQuest Lost & Found

Working principle

The working principle of Lost & Found is quite simple. It is assumed that all data will remain on the hard drive even after deletion or formatting until it is overwritten with a new file fragment. Simply formatting the data is far from gone, because it is still physically on the disk, but has been deleted from the hard disk's FAT (File Allocation Table, a kind of book that says which file is in which cluster). Even if the hard drive is repartitioned, it's not all day long. However, the prerequisite for a successful recovery is in all cases that the file to be saved has not yet been overwritten by a new one. So you shouldn't try to install Windows on the hard drive on which you still want to restore data, because Windows itself doesn't come with any tools and with the installation you sometimes destroy the data that you wanted to save. After Lost & Found has completed its search for data that can still be recovered, these files must be saved on another drive. Saveon the disk that holds the data to be rescued is not possible because the topmost principle is: Do not change the SourceDrive with any action, so that as much data as possible can be saved. The only backup medium that can be used here is a second hard drive or floppy disk. If you only want to save a few documents, you should get by with a floppy disk.

On the next page: Test procedure

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