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Optical wireless mice in the test: Anubis and Logitech in comparison

Optical wireless mice in the test: Anubis and Logitech in comparison

Introduction

While progress continues with components such as CPU or graphics card, there has not been much news to report about mice in recent years. However, with the introduction of mice with an optical sensor instead of a sphere, significant progress could be reported here as well. The next step came with the introduction of wireless mice that were also equipped with an optical sensor. In addition to Anubis (Typhoon Optical RF Mouse), Logitech (Cordless MouseMan Optical) was one of the first providers of an optical wireless mouse. In terms of design, these mice are indistinguishable from 'conventional' ones. Only in darker rooms can the red light indicate that it is an optical mouse. The following test will show whether the Logitech and Anubis mice are also useful in practice.

Scope of delivery

Logitech: In the rather large pack there are two Mignon or AA batteries and a driver CD with everything you need next to the mouse. In a separate plastic bag there is also a guarantee certificate, a booklet to prevent damage to health ('Comfort Guidelines'), a short product overview from Logitech, a registration card and quick start instructions. And if you don't have a USB port on your computer, you can simply use the PS/2 USB adapter supplied, which works just as well.

Optical wireless mice:Anubis vs. Logitech
Optical wireless mice: Anubis vs. Logitech

Anubis: You will find everything you need in the pack, which is also quite large. There are the mouse, the charging and receiving station incl. Power supply unit, a PS/2-USB adapter, two micro or AAA NiMH batteries (nickel metal hydride; 1.2V; 700mAh) and a driver floppy disk will be discussed in more detail later. With both mice, everything you need for operation is in the pack.

Optical Wireless mice: Anubis vs. Logitech
Optical wireless mice: Anubis vs. Logitech

Ergonomics

Logitech: In terms of design, the slightly curved shape of the Cordless MouseMan Optical is immediately noticeable. However, this also suggests that the mouse is only suitable for right-handers or not for left-handers. You can grasp and operate the mouse well with your left hand, but you don't have much of the 4th mouse button, as it can only be reached with the little finger and is therefore difficult to use. For right-handers (including me), the mouse is a delight in terms of ergonomics. The hand lies smoothly over the mouse, the thumb and little finger rest on the rubber surfaces on the left and right of the mouse, the index and middle fingers lie loosely on the large, easy-to-use buttons. To make the design even more appealing, a large Logitech logo denounces the top of the mouse. The gray/blue color combination also looks very chic.

Optical wireless mice: Anubis vs. Logitech

Anubis: At the In contrast to the Logitech mouse, the Optical RF Mouse is immediately noticeable because of its symmetrical design. Left and right sides are exactly the same. This suggests that left-handed and right-handed users must be able to use the mouse equally well. As a right-hander you don't notice any difference apart from the handling, whether you hold or operate the mouse with the right or left. However, if you lay on your hand completely and keep your fingers straight, then the right/5. Mouse button a bit awkward to use, because you have to move your hand back a little. Operation differs from user to user because everyone has a slightly different hand.

Optical wireless mice: Anubis vs. Logitech

On the next page: Installation

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