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nVidia GeForce4 MX 440 in the test: Inno3D, Gainward, Leadtek and Prolink in comparison

nVidia GeForce4 MX 440 in the test: Inno3D, Gainward, Leadtek and Prolink in comparison

Foreword

Once again spring is approaching and promises next to longer days with mostly just as bad weather as in winter, as every six months, a new product line of nVidia's graphics chips.

Chronologically roughly scrolled back, we should now look at the meanwhile fourth incarnation of nVidia so titled 'GPU'.

Since the GeForce2 has hardly any advantages over the GeForce256, theirIts direct predecessor, the GeForce3, which was available almost a year ago, was the first to offer pixel and vertex shaders in the consumer market; Technologically a clear difference to the old GeForce2 series.

Now we are back to an even number as an addition to the name of a GeForce and therefore it would be obvious to find again mainly more speed and rather few technical innovations. We have already dealt with these, or rather the lack of them, in our little preview , so that after introducing the individual cards, we will only briefly summarize the most important ones. For the test this time, we have four cards that we also want to compare with a Kyro-II, a GeForce2Ti and a GeForce3 Ti200 in order to be able to take a limited look beyond the GeForce4MX's nose.

Cards at a glance

For the test this time, we have four cards that we also want to compare with a Kyro-II, a GeForce2Ti and a GeForce3Ti200 in order to have a limited view of the GeForce4MX's bigger picture to throw.

The four cards that are compared are specifically the GeForce4MX440 models from Inno3D with the name Tornado GeForce4MX, the Gainward GeForce4 PowerPack pro600TV Golden Sample, the Leadtek WinFast A170DDR T and, last but not least, the Prolink Pixelview GeForce4MX.

What they all have in common is the restriction to a single monitor output and one TV-out, despite the possibilities of the GeF orce4MX chips to provide two full monitor outputs independently of each other, which was previously not possible with the TwinView of the old GeForce2MX, thanks to nView. Furthermore, all four have 64MB DDR-RAM, which is clocked with a nominal 200MHz, which corresponds to the data transfer rate of 400MHz SDR-RAM. The graphics chip, liked by nVidiaAlso known as a GPU, it clocks at a fast 270MHz.

On the next page: Inno3D