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Intel's new socket is future-proof

Intel's new socket is future-proof

Even if Intel has done a lot in processor development in the past few years, as a user you usually found yourself in the rain. No sooner had you bought a board with a processor than a new processor, a new chip and a new socket were presented within a short time.

With the Pentium II it was slot 1 that lasted until the Pentium III Katmai. Due to the advancing development and the improvement in the production possibilities, with Pentium III Coppermine one could return to the base from which one had originally come. However, the name of this socket was not socket 7, but socket 370. With the introduction of the Pentium 4, this is now also old-fashioned. But that is not enough. While the current Pentium 4, codenamed Willamette, finds its place on the 423 socket, the Pentium 4, codenamed Northwood, which is manufactured in 0.13 µm and has an L2 cache twice as large as its predecessor, is a new and closed one the incompatible Socket 478 was introduced to its predecessor. As an end user, you naturally ask yourself what this is about, because after all you are forced to purchase a new mainboard with every processor update. Fortunately, as we learned, this development will not take place in the foreseeable future. Since Intel has now laid the foundations for much higher clock rates with the new socket, they want to keep the socket 478, which will be released in autumn, alive for about two years. The Intel Pentium 4 code name Northwood is to be brought to clock frequencies of up to 3.6 GHz within this second room, with no change to the base planned. The only question that remains is whether other technologies, such as Serial ATA and the like, will not force you to update the mainboard by then. In addition, the experience of the last few weeks has shown that the same base is not necessarily withCompatibility equates to. Finally, the Intel Pentium III, code name Tualatin, also fits into the commercially available Socket 370, but a revised i815 chipset is required in B-Step to support it.

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