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Intel shows 10 GHz CPU at room temperature

Intel shows 10 GHz CPU at room temperature

Since the efficiency of the processors has fallen behind more and more in the past few years and the power consumption and the production costs were hardly related to the performance provided, Intel's researchers had set themselves the task of eliminating this deficiency.

They presented the result at this year's International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco. Above all, Intel relies on more economical transistors that are closer together. The magic words here are 'Body Bias', 'Adaptive Body Bias' and 'Complementary Signal Generator'. These expressions, which can only be understood by experts, stand for Intel's new technologies, with which one can pack high-performance transistors with a lower current consumption than before on a normal silicon DIE very close together. In order to present this new technology, Intel therefore showed two new chips at the ISSCC, the transistors of which consume around 23 percent less power during a switching process than the transistors on current CPUs. Intel was even able to reduce the 'leakage currents' with unused transistors by 71 percent. The two CPUs presented ran at room temperature without complex cooling with 5 and 10 GHz. The 5 GHz processor is a 32-bit integer processor that, as usual, communicates to the outside via input and output FIFOs. But the situation is different with the 10 GHz CPU. It only consists of an integer arithmetic unit (ALU) and a scheduler, it lacks input and output channels for communication. Of course, the chips, which are just 1.61 x 1.44 millimeters in size, are only prototypes intended to illustrate the new technology. But already in the next but one level of Intel's processor technology (Pentium 6), the new transistors are said to have been completely incorporated into the CPUs. Until then, you want them graduallygradually introduce into CPU production. Whether Intel already manages to produce CPUs with the Pentium 6 that work completely without cooling at normal room temperature remains rather questionable, but at least it has been recognized that the power consumption must be reduced and used more efficiently>