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Intel introduces 'Itanium'

Intel introduces 'Itanium'

Intel finally officially presented the first 64-bit processor, the Itanium, planned since 1993, yesterday evening. After an extremely long development period, the CPU previously known under the code name 'Merced' is now coming onto the market with a full two years delay.

Since Intel itself does not expect the CPU to be a great success, the Itanium can be seen more as a pioneer in the 64-bit sector, which should offer both Intel and software developers first impressions of the future sector and opportunities for experimentation. The much more powerful McKinley will be officially presented by the end of the year. The Itanium is currently clocked between 733 and 800 MHz and has 32KB L1 and 96KB L2 cache across all versions. The L3 cache varies between 2 and 4 MB. Intel's new CPU has a price range of $ 1,117 for the Itanium 733 MHz 2MB to $ 4,227 for the 800 with 4MB L3 cache (with a purchase of 1000 units) both clock and L3 cache variance. Due to the enormous number of 325 million built-in transistors (Pentium 4 approx. 42 million), the Itanium has a gigantic thermal output of 130W (800 MHz + 4 MB cache). As with AMD's Athlon, the 'DDR processor bus' is supported. However, normal 133 MHz SDRAM is used as RAM. The first systems should soon be available from Dell, Fujitsu, HP, IBM, Mitsubishi, SGI and Siemens. The 'Precision Workstation 730' announced by Dell but not yet available will cost around 21,000 DM with a 733MHz Itanium (2MB cache), 1GB SDRAM, Matrox G450 and 18GB U160 SCSI hard drive.

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