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Intel discontinues production of the 1.4 GHz Celeron

Intel discontinues production of the 1.4 GHz Celeron

In recent years, Intel has brought various processors with partly different architectures and functions to the people under the umbrella term 'Celeron'. Since you can now shine with models with a clock rate of up to 2.2 GHz, the last Celeron with a Pentium III core is now being discontinued.

However, the Celeron based on the last Pentium III core (Tualatin) has something special about it. Because of its 0.13 µm manufacturing and its 256kB L2 cache, it is not only superior to the Celerons based on the first Pentium 4 core (code name Willamette) from a technology standpoint. Because these Willamette Celerons, which are still manufactured in the somewhat older 0.18 µm process, had to admit defeat to their predecessors in various benchmarks, despite a significantly higher clock rate (1.7 GHz and 1.8 GHz). The L2 cache of the Willamette-128, the exact name of the Celeron based on the Netburst architecture, with 128 kB smaller dimensioned L2 cache contributed to the rest of the performance compared to its predecessor. In the meantime, however, Intel has also turned the clock screw with the Celerons, so that the 2.0 GHz model can already find its way into a higher performance class. More on that in our detailed review of the 2.0 GHz Celeron .

Both the boxed and the tray variants without a cooler are affected by the production stop of the 1.4 GHz Celeron. The chip giant will continue to accept orders for this processor until April 11, 2003; the last delivery will be on July 11, 2003 (boxed) and December 12 (tray). However, the same applies here: Only while stocks last.