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Instructions: Do-it-yourself water cooling

Instructions: Do-it-yourself water cooling

Test run

After the water cooling has been completely filled, the safe test run should now follow. And lo and behold, after just a few seconds, water droplets were emerging from both connections of the pump. Since we didn't want to get involved with the adhesive method proposed by pc-cooling for the time being, we resorted to sealing rings. After filling it again, the upper outlet proved to be tight, but the 'inlet' continued to leak (plastic threads are not the guarantee for tight connections). A sealing tape turned out to be a clean alternative to adhesive.

Installation
Installation

In contrast to the two plastic threads, the plug-in connections used proved to be one hundred percent watertight, so that after the somewhat idle repair work on the pump, the circuit could be declared fit for use. Since the CPU cooler is now screwed in the system onto the processor prepared with the thermal pastehad to, concentration was the order of the day. After all important components had been installed, the housing could be closed.

Installation
Installation

Result

So far we have left it with the assembly of the radiator without additional cooling and, out of pure interest, wanted to test whether the Athlon C 1333 under full load can also be operated in this absolutely noiseless way from the radiator Can be kept in check. The UD Agent was started at a room temperature of 22 ° C and the development of the temperature was observed. (Note: the EPoX board used shows, like the models from Asus, slightly higher CPU temperatures than some other brands).

After the temperature had leveled off to a high 49 ° C after 30 minutes of idling, a further increase to 60 ° C could be observed over the next 45 minutes after the start of the UD-Agent. This value may sound threatening to some readers, but if you look at the previously achieved results of our air cooling (GlobalWin WBK 38 'Silent') of 65 ° C, an improvement can be seen even in passive operation. High-end air cooling should produce significantly better results, but it should certainly not work silently.

So let's keep in mind: At 22 ° C room temperature, an Athlon C 1333MHz is still under full load on the Swiftech system just to control. However, this is not advisable, at least for extremely power-hungry CPUs (and ultimately not intended by Swiftech). Because a lot of space for warmer months or one or the other MHz moreis not available. Even if the picture looks a lot more relaxed with less power-hungry Athlons or even a Duron.

Before installing a fan, we recalled the objective. 'Better cooling performance despite lower noise levels'. In a nutshell, the additional fan, which previously had to shovel the waste heat from the CPU out of the case, was freed from its anchoring and fixed over the radiator using an angle. (We deliberately kept a little more than one cm distance. On the one hand, even with a fan, the air 'scatters' far over the radiator, on the other hand, when the fan rests directly on the cooling fins, the air sometimes pushes back and becomes extreme loud.) Since the waste heat from the CPU is no longer blown into the computer, a decrease in the case temperature was observed despite this measure.

Installation

The good and particularly constant cooling of a Wakü is also evident when overclocking is concerned. Overclocking the 1333 to 1466MHz at 1.85V only warmed up 1 ° C under full load and in idle.

And what about the background noise? More than satisfactory, thoughthe initial state (GlobalWin WBK 38) is selected as the reference point. The Eheim 1048 makes practically no noise after a one-minute start-up phase at the latest. The pleasantly quiet hum is negligible when the case wall is closed. However, this requires a one hundred percent free circulation of air bubbles, since otherwise the pump occasionally 'chokes' itself and begins to rattle. Ultimately, the noise emission depends exclusively on the fans on the radiator (a LowNoise power supply unit and a quiet additional fan (mainboard etc.) required). In our test runs, there was no difference in cooling performance between one or two fans. The used, quite quiet NoName fan was enough to keep the radiator just above room temperature. In the end, it is up to you to choose between the smoothest possible running and adequate cooling and maximum performance with a bit more noise.

Conclusion

No question about installing water cooling goes far beyond the effort involved in installing a conventional cooler. Planning, assembly, test runs and possible improvements devour an hour or two, because there is no standardized procedure. The scope of delivery and the objective (smooth running, maximum cooling performance) rather require an individual approach. In the end, it should be clarified before purchasing to what extent, for example, cooling should be left to a separate construction or a radiator with fan and whether the components should all be housed internally for better (LAN) transport and a closed circuit should be available. With the wide range of products, a little research on the internet shouldn't hurt, in order to avoid surprises, such as those we unfortunately experienced when installing the radiator. Once the more or less big hurdles of assembly have been overcome, the 'Wakü' turns out to berelatively straightforward. Assuming good seals, the system should also perform reliably in the long term. The 'SWIFTECH MCW 372 Watercooling-Kit' also offers a good basis for safe transport thanks to the non-existent and, as shown, unnecessary expansion tank To have given insight into theory and practice around the topic of water cooling. As mentioned, we have limited ourselves to the most important elements of the installation. Because for hobbyists and 'case modders' the work is only just beginning. After all, hoses, radiators and the like need to be directed in stylish colors and anchors. Well then, Dremel safe!

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