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Instructions: Do-it-yourself water cooling

Instructions: Do-it-yourself water cooling

Assembly of the heat sink

In order to be able to consider the later position of the cooler for the hose cut, the previously dismantled comes now EPoX board back on the plan, on which the Swiftech cooler will now be mounted for test purposes. Swiftech relies on a mixture between conventional 'clip mounting' and the retaining screws known from heavy coolers. Tightening the screws compresses the spring and the brackets offer space and elasticity for assembly. If both sides of the cooler sit on the base, the springs 'pull' the copper body towards the CPU by slowly loosening the screws.

Installation

The installation is basically not that different from that of one conventional cooler. As always, careful action and a steady hand should be the top priority. The mainboard then moves back into the PC for the hose cutting.

Laying the hoses

After The most important components of the water cooling have now taken their final place in the system, the two enclosed hoses can be cut to the appropriate dimensions and laid. In order not to lose the overview, we systematically follow the cycle to be aimed for. The first thing on the plan is the route from the pump to the CPU. Make sure to select the output of the pump in order to use the fresh pressure for cooling the CPU. In our case the hose leads from the top of the pump towards the central entrance of the Swiftech cooler. Since, as already mentioned, the enclosed PE hose is extremely stiff and can only be shaped under pressure, we have divided the hose halfway with an included angle piece, thus reducing the tension. In order that the components that were previously banned find their way back into the computer without any problems, the hard disk must also give a brief guest performance in order to avoid conflicts with the hose. We do not connect the hose and cooler for the time being, as the force to be applied here could quickly damage the CPU and the socket.

Installation

From the cooler, the path leads us directly into the radiator to cool the water that has just been heated as quickly as possible. As an exit we use a recess for oneSerial interface in the tower. Here, too, the hose is relieved of excessive pressure through an angle and, at the same time, led directly to the radiator. To be on the safe side, we do not establish the connection to the heat sink for the time being.

Installation

The last stage leads from the radiator back into the pump and closes the circuit. Halfway through and outside of the housing, we have integrated the 'Fill and Bleed Valve Assembly Kit' to make filling easy. To accommodate the valve combination in the housing, the midi tower again seems too narrow. The hoses and valves running backwards should not be a problem during transport.

Installation
Installation

In order to close the last gap in the system, the mainboard including the cooler is removed again, the switech dismantled and put into the circuit separately. All connections should then be checked again to ensure that they are properly secured and the hard drive can also be placed in an anti-static cover again. Nothing stands in the way of filling in the water.

Installation

Filling the circuit

As already announced, it is now time to take a closer look at the 'Fill and Bleed Valve Assembly Kit' . With the help of this device, the Swiftech water cooling is not limited to a permanent expansion tankreliant. The system ultimately consists of a clever arrangement of three valves and two T-pieces.

To prepare for filling, we put the PC on its side and a tub with distilled water. Water placed in an elevated position. Since air is known to be lighter than water and therefore rises, it should be able to escape more easily.

Installation
Installation

As shown in the figure, the actual filling process takes place in three steps. In step one, the valves are set so that the water has to take the 'detour' via the tub to release any air it may contain. When the pump is switched off, it is not your hand but your mouth that you need to open and suck on the end of the hose coming from the radiator. The other hose is to be held in the water. As soon as the sucked in water reaches the pump, it can be activated and takes over the 'suction work' from now on. This cycle should be maintained for about 30 seconds until no more rising bubbles can be seen.

In the second step, the middle valve is opened for a few seconds to allow the air contained there to escape as well.

The third step involves closing valves one and three and opening the second valve. The circuit should now be free of bubbles and closed.

On the next page: Test run