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CD burners are 10 percent more expensive

CD burners are 10 percent more expensive

CD burners will soon be 10 percent more expensive in Germany, as the leading manufacturers and importers have agreed to pay a copyright fee of six euros for every device sold. This applies retrospectively to July 1, 2001.

This tax is of course passed on to the buyer again, so that the End devices increase in price. The decision for the copyright levy was announced on Thursday by the Federal Association for Information Technology, Telecommunications and New Media e.V. (BITKOM). BITKOM had agreed on a general contract with the collecting societies for writing and sound with regard to the copyright dispute, so that 'price increases cannot be avoided'. For years the collecting societies had been in dispute with the industry as to whether the copyright law could also be transferred to computers, CD burners and printers and whether the author of a work would therefore have to receive appropriate fees from the manufacturers. The collecting societies had actually planned a fee of 10 euros per device, but now they could agree on a compromise on six euros. According to estimates by the Society for Consumer Research, German households were equipped with around seven million CD burners last year. Ultimately, the Federal Government's remuneration report, which provides for a copyright fee for a number of digital devices, was ultimately decisive for the copyright levy. Jörg Menno Harms, Vice President of BITKOM, commented on the contract as follows:

'Against this background, we had no choice but to agree to the agreement. By signing the overall contract, we are now creating the urgently needed planning security for the companies The taxes are not a free ticket for music and software pirates. They are only used to compensate for legally permitted private copies. '