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Appeal proceedings in the antitrust dispute over Microsoft

Appeal proceedings in the antitrust dispute over Microsoft

The antitrust dispute over the world's largest software company Microsoft is now entering the next round. The two-day hearings at a federal appeals court in Washington begin today, with defense attorneys being heard from both sides.

Microsoft naturally wants to prevent the company from being broken up into two independent companies, as was decided in June last year. Microsoft has been sued for abusing its monopoly on Windows. The judge Thomas Penfield Jackson agreed with the plaintiffs in the first instance and found that Microsoft had violated the antitrust law, since Internet Explorer is firmly integrated into Windows. The judgment that Microsoft should be split into two companies has been suspended until a final decision can be reached. Microsoft wants to argue today and tomorrow that Judge Jackson was biased and his verdict was just an 'excessive' measure against Microsoft. In addition, from Microsoft's point of view, the antitrust law has not been violated. Microsoft relies on the allegation that the judge Jackson was biased on the fact that he did not hold any further hearings on possible punishments against Microsoft at the time. Microsoft has a good chance of achieving at least partial success today and tomorrow, as two of the seven judges attending the hearings had earlier ruled in Microsoft's favor.

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